In-depth security news and investigation
  1. Microsoft Patch Tuesday, June 2019 Edition

    Microsoft on Tuesday released updates to fix 88 security vulnerabilities in its Windows operating systems and related software. The most dangerous of these include four flaws for which there is already exploit code available. There's also a scary bug affecting all versions of Microsoft Office that can be triggered by a malicious link or attachment. And of course Adobe has its customary monthly security update for Flash Player.
  2. LabCorp: 7.7 Million Consumers Hit in Collections Firm Breach

    Medical testing giant LabCorp. said today personal and financial data on some 7.7 million consumers were exposed by a breach at a third-party billing collections firm. That third party -- the American Medical Collection Agency (AMCA) -- also recently notified competing firm Quest Diagnostics that an intrusion in its payments Web site exposed personal, financial and medical data on nearly 12 million Quest patients. Just a few days ago, the news was all about how Quest had suffered a major breach. But today's disclosure by LabCorp. suggests we are nowhere near done hearing about other companies with millions of consumers victimized because of this incident: The AMCA is a New York company with a storied history of aggressively collecting debt for a broad range of businesses, including medical labs and hospitals, direct marketers, telecom companies, and state and local traffic/toll agencies.
  3. Report: No ‘Eternal Blue’ Exploit Found in Baltimore City Ransomware

    For almost the past month, key computer systems serving the government of Baltimore, Md. have been held hostage by a ransomware strain known as "Robbinhood." Media publications have cited sources saying the Robbinhood version that hit Baltimore city computers was powered by "Eternal Blue," a hacking tool developed by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) and leaked online in 2017. But new analysis suggests that while Eternal Blue could have been used to spread the infection, the Robbinhood malware itself contains no traces of it.
  4. NY Investigates Exposure of 885 Million Mortgage Documents

    New York regulators are investigating a weakness that exposed 885 million mortgage records at First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] as the first test of the state's strict new cybersecurity regulation. That measure, which went into effect in March 2019 and is considered among the toughest in the nation, requires financial companies to regularly audit and report on how they protect sensitive data, and provides for fines in cases where violations were reckless or willful.
  5. Canada Uses Civil Anti-Spam Law in Bid to Fine Malware Purveyors

    Canadian government regulators are using the country's powerful new anti-spam law to pursue hefty fines of up to a million dollars against Canadian citizens suspected of helping to spread malicious software.
  6. Should Failing Phish Tests Be a Fireable Offense?

    Would your average Internet user would be any more vigilant against phishing scams if he or she faced the real possibility of losing their job after falling for one too many of these emails? Recently, I met someone at a conference who said his employer had in fact terminated employees for such repeated infractions. As this was the first time I'd ever heard of an organization actually doing this, I asked some phishing experts what they thought (spoiler alert: they're not fans of this particular teaching approach).
  7. First American Financial Corp. Leaked Hundreds of Millions of Title Insurance Records

    The Web site for Fortune 500 real estate title insurance giant First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] leaked hundreds of millions of documents related to mortgage deals going back to 2003, until notified this week by KrebsOnSecurity. The digitized records -- including bank account numbers and statements, mortgage and tax records, Social Security numbers, wire transaction receipts, and drivers license images -- were available without authentication to anyone with a Web browser.
  8. Legal Threats Make Powerful Phishing Lures

    Some of the most convincing email phishing and malware attacks come disguised as nastygrams from a law firm. Such scams typically notify the recipient that he/she is being sued, and instruct them to review the attached file and respond within a few days -- or else. Here's a look at a recent spam campaign that peppered more than 100,000 business email addresses with fake legal threats harboring malware.
  9. Account Hijacking Forum OGusers Hacked

    Ogusers[.]com -- a forum popular among people involved in hijacking online accounts and conducting SIM swapping attacks to seize control over victims' phone numbers -- has itself been hacked, exposing the email addresses, hashed passwords, IP addresses and private messages for nearly 113,000 forum users.
  10. Feds Target $100M ‘GozNym’ Cybercrime Network

    Law enforcement agencies in the United States and Europe today unsealed charges against 11 alleged members of the GozNym malware network, an international cybercriminal syndicate suspected of stealing $100 million from more than 41,000 victims with the help of a stealthy banking trojan by the same name.

Copyright © 2019 • All Rights Reserved.Sensible Voice, LLC
1 High Street • Brandon, VT 05733 • Contact Us • Privacy Policy