In-depth security news and investigation
  1. Spammed Bomb Threat Hoax Demands Bitcoin

    A new email extortion scam is making the rounds, threatening that someone has planted bombs within the recipient's building that will be detonated unless a hefty bitcoin ransom is paid by the end of the business day.
  2. Scanning for Flaws, Scoring for Security

    Is it fair to judge an organization's information security posture simply by looking at its Internet-facing assets for weaknesses commonly sought after and exploited by attackers, such as outdated software or accidentally exposed data and devices? Fair or not, a number of nascent efforts are using just such an approach to derive security scores for companies and entire industries. What's remarkable is how many organizations don't make an effort to view their public online assets as the rest of the world sees them -- until it's too late.
  3. Patch Tuesday, December 2018 Edition

    Adobe and Microsoft each released updates today to tackle critical security weaknesses in their software. Microsoft's December patch batch is relatively light, addressing more than three dozen vulnerabilities in Windows and related applications. Adobe has issued security fixes for its Acrobat and PDF Reader products, and has a patch for yet another zero-day flaw in Flash Player that is already being exploited in the wild.
  4. How Internet Savvy are Your Leaders?

    Back in April 2015, I tweeted about receiving a letter via snail mail suggesting the search engine rankings for a domain registered in my name would suffer if I didn't pay a bill for some kind of dubious-looking service I'd never heard of. But it wasn't until the past week that it become clear how many organizations -- including towns, cities and political campaigns -- actually have fallen for this brazen scam.
  5. Bomb Threat Hoaxer, DDos Boss Gets 3 Years

    The alleged ringleader of a gang of cyber hooligans that made bomb threats against hundreds of schools and launched debilitating denial-of-service attacks against Web sites (including KrebsOnSecurity on multiple occasions) has been sentenced to three years in a U.K. prison, and faces the possibility of additional charges from U.S.-based law enforcement officials. 
  6. A Breach, or Just a Forced Password Reset?

    Software giant Citrix Systems recently forced a password reset for many users of its Sharefile content collaboration service, warning it would be doing this on a regular basis in response to password-guessing attacks that target people who re-use passwords across multiple Web sites. Many Sharefile users interpreted this as a breach at Citrix and/or Sharefile, but the company maintains that's not the case. Here's a closer look at what happened, and some ideas about how to avoid a repeat of this scenario going forward.
  7. Jared, Kay Jewelers Parent Fixes Data Leak

    The parent firm of bling retailers Jared and Kay Jewelers has fixed a bug in the Web sites of both companies that exposed the order information for all of their online customers.
  8. What the Marriott Breach Says About Security

    We don't yet know the root cause(s) that forced Marriott this week to disclose a four-year-long breach involving the personal and financial information of 500 million guests of its Starwood hotel properties. But anytime we see such a colossal intrusion go undetected for so long, the ultimate cause is usually a failure to adopt the most important principle in cybersecurity defense that applies to both corporations and consumers: Assume you are compromised.
  9. Marriott: Data on 500 Million Guests Stolen in 4-Year Breach

    Hospitality giant Marriott today disclosed a massive data breach exposing the personal and financial information on as many as a half billion customers who made reservations at any of its Starwood properties over the past four years.
  10. Half of all Phishing Sites Now Have the Padlock

    Maybe you were once advised to "look for the padlock" as a means of telling legitimate e-commerce sites from phishing or malware traps. Unfortunately, this has never been more useless advice. New research indicates that half of all phishing scams are now hosted on Web sites whose Internet address includes the padlock and begins with "https://".

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