In-depth security news and investigation
  1. Hackers Were Inside Citrix for Five Months

    Networking software giant Citrix Systems says malicious hackers were inside its networks for five months between 2018 and 2019, making off with personal and financial data on company employees, contractors, interns, job candidates and their dependents. The disclosure comes almost a year after Citrix acknowledged that digital intruders had broken in by probing its employee accounts for weak passwords.
  2. Encoding Stolen Credit Card Data on Barcodes

    Crooks are constantly dreaming up new ways to use and conceal stolen credit card data. According to the U.S. Secret Service, the latest scheme involves stolen card information embedded in barcodes affixed to phony money network rewards cards. The scammers then pay for merchandise by instructing a cashier to scan the barcode and enter the expiration date and card security code.
  3. Pay Up, Or We’ll Make Google Ban Your Ads

    A new email-based extortion scheme apparently is making the rounds, targeting Web site owners serving banner ads through Google's AdSense program. In this scam, the fraudsters demand bitcoin in exchange for a promise not to flood the publisher's ads with so much bot and junk traffic that Google's automated anti-fraud systems suspend the user's AdSense account for suspicious traffic.
  4. A Light at the End of Liberty Reserve’s Demise?

    In May 2013, the U.S. Justice Department seized Liberty Reserve, alleging the virtual currency service acted as a $6 billion financial hub for the cybercrime world. Prompted by assurances that the government would one day afford Liberty Reserve users a chance to reclaim any funds seized as part of the takedown, KrebsOnSecurity filed a claim shortly thereafter to see if and when this process might take place. This week, an investigator with the U.S. Internal Revenue service finally got in touch to discuss my claim.
  5. Microsoft Patch Tuesday, February 2020 Edition

    Microsoft today released updates to plug nearly 100 security holes in various versions of its Windows operating system and related software, including a zero-day vulnerability in Internet Explorer (IE) that is actively being exploited. Also, Adobe has issued a bevy of security updates for its various products, including Flash Player and Adobe Reader/Acrobat.
  6. U.S. Charges 4 Chinese Military Officers in 2017 Equifax Hack

    The U.S. Justice Department today unsealed indictments against four Chinese officers of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) accused of perpetrating the 2017 hack against consumer credit bureau Equifax that led to the theft of personal data on nearly 150 million Americans. DOJ officials said the four men were responsible for carrying out the largest theft of sensitive personal information by state-sponsored hackers ever recorded. 
  7. Dangerous Domain Corp.com Goes Up for Sale

    As an early domain name investor, Mike O'Connor had by 1994 snatched up several choice online destinations, including bar.com, cafes.com, grill.com, place.com, pub.com and television.com. Some he sold over the years, but for the past 26 years O'Connor refused to auction perhaps the most sensitive domain in his stable -- corp.com. It is sensitive because years of testing shows whoever wields it would have access to an unending stream of passwords, email and other proprietary data belonging to hundreds of thousands of systems at major companies around the globe.
  8. When Your Used Car is a Little Too ‘Mobile’

    Many modern vehicles let owners use the Internet or a mobile device to control the car's locks, track location and performance data, and start the engine. But who exactly owns that control is not always clear when these smart cars are sold or leased anew. Here's the story of one former electric vehicle owner who discovered he could still gain remote, online access to his old automobile years after his lease ended.
  9. Booter Boss Busted By Bacon Pizza Buy

    A Pennsylvania man who operated one of the Internet's longest-running online attack-for-hire or "booter" services was sentenced to five years probation today. While the young man's punishment was heavily tempered by his current poor health, the defendant's dietary choices may have contributed to both his capture and the lenient sentencing: Investigators say the onetime booter boss's identity became clear after he ordered a bacon and chicken pizza delivered to his home using the same email address he originally used to register his criminal attack service.
  10. Iowa Prosecutors Drop Charges Against Men Hired to Test Their Security

    On Sept. 11, 2019, two security experts at a company that had been hired by the state of Iowa to test the physical and network security of its judicial system were arrested while probing the security of an Iowa county courthouse, jailed in orange jumpsuits, charged with burglary, and held on $100,000 bail. On Thursday Jan. 30, prosecutors in Iowa announced they had dropped the criminal charges. The news came while KrebsOnSecurity was conducting a video interview with the two accused (featured below).

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