In-depth security news and investigation
  1. Meet the World’s Biggest ‘Bulletproof’ Hoster

    For at least the past decade, a computer crook variously known as "Yalishanda," "Downlow" and "Stas_vl" has run one of the most popular "bulletproof" Web hosting services catering to a vast array of phishing sites, cybercrime forums and malware download servers. What follows are a series of clues that point to the likely real-life identity of a Russian man who appears responsible for enabling a ridiculous amount of cybercriminal activity on the Internet today.
  2. Is ‘REvil’ the New GandCrab Ransomware?

    The cybercriminals behind the GandCrab ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS) offering recently announced they were closing up shop and retiring after having allegedly earned more than $2 billion in extortion payments from victims. But a growing body of evidence suggests the GandCrab team have instead quietly regrouped behind a more exclusive and advanced ransomware program known variously as "REvil," "Sodin," and "Sodinokibi."
  3. FEC: Campaigns Can Use Discounted Cybersecurity Services

    The U.S. Federal Election Commission (FEC) said today companies can offer discounted cybersecurity services to political campaigns without running afoul of existing campaign finance laws, provided they already do the same for other non-political entities. The decision comes amid much jostling on Capitol Hill over election security at the state level, and fresh warnings from U.S. intelligence agencies about impending cyber attacks targeting candidates in the lead up to the 2020 election.
  4. Patch Tuesday Lowdown, July 2019 Edition

    Microsoft today released software updates to plug almost 80 security holes in its Windows operating systems and related software. Among them are fixes for two zero-day flaws that are actively being exploited in the wild, and patches to quash four other bugs that were publicly detailed prior to today, potentially giving attackers a head start in working out how to use them for nefarious purposes.
  5. Who’s Behind the GandCrab Ransomware?

    The crooks behind an affiliate program that paid cybercriminals to install the destructive and wildly successful GandCrab ransomware strain announced on May 31, 2019 they were terminating the program after allegedly having earned more than $2 billion in extortion payouts from victims. What follows is a deep dive into who may be responsible for recruiting new members to help spread the contagion.
  6. Microsoft to Require Multi-Factor Authentication for Cloud Solution Providers

    It might be difficult to fathom how this isn't already mandatory, but Microsoft Corp. says it will soon force all Cloud Solution Providers (CSPs) that help companies manage their Microsoft Azure and Office365 accounts to use multi-factor authentication. The move comes amid a noticeable uptick in phishing and malware attacks targeting CSP employees and contractors.
  7. Breach at Cloud Solution Provider PCM Inc.

    A digital intrusion at PCM Inc., a major U.S.-based cloud solution provider, allowed hackers to access email and file sharing systems for some of the company's clients, KrebsOnSecurity has learned.
  8. Tracing the Supply Chain Attack on Android

    Earlier this month, Google disclosed that a supply chain attack by one of its vendors resulted in malicious software being pre-installed on millions of new budget Android devices. Google didn't exactly name those responsible, but said it believes the offending vendor uses the nicknames "Yehuo" or "Blazefire." What follows is a deep dive into the identity of that Chinese vendor, which appears to have a long and storied history of pushing the envelope on mobile malware.
  9. Collections Firm Behind LabCorp, Quest Breaches Files for Bankruptcy

    A medical billing firm responsible for a recent eight-month data breach that exposed the personal information on nearly 20 million Americans has filed for bankruptcy, citing "enormous expenses" from notifying affected consumers and the loss of its four largest customers.
  10. Microsoft Patch Tuesday, June 2019 Edition

    Microsoft on Tuesday released updates to fix 88 security vulnerabilities in its Windows operating systems and related software. The most dangerous of these include four flaws for which there is already exploit code available. There's also a scary bug affecting all versions of Microsoft Office that can be triggered by a malicious link or attachment. And of course Adobe has its customary monthly security update for Flash Player.

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